What is Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)?

FMLA - Family Medical Leave Act
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The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is a United States labor law that provides eligible employees with unpaid job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons. The act was signed into law by President Bill Clinton on February 5, 1993, and it has since been amended several times.

The FMLA applies to all public agencies, including state, local, and federal employers, as well as to private-sector employers with 50 or more employees within a 75-mile radius. To be eligible for FMLA leave, employees must have worked for their employer for at least 12 months, and they must have worked at least 1,250 hours during the previous 12 months.

The FMLA allows eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave in a 12-month period for the following reasons:

  1. The birth of a child and to care for the newborn child within one year of birth.
  2. The placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care and to care for the newly placed child within one year of placement.
  3. To care for the employee’s spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition.
  4. A serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the essential functions of his or her job.
  5. Any qualifying exigency arising out of the fact that the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent is a covered military member on “covered active duty” (or has been notified of an impending call or order to covered active duty).
  6. To care for a covered service member with a serious injury or illness if the employee is the spouse, son, daughter, parent, or next of kin of the service member.

The FMLA provides several important protections to eligible employees who take leave under its provisions. First, employers must continue to provide group health insurance coverage for the employee during the leave period, as if the employee were still actively employed. Second, employers must restore the employee to the same or equivalent position upon their return from leave, with a few exceptions. Third, employers cannot interfere with or retaliate against employees for exercising their rights under the FMLA.

To take leave under the FMLA, employees must provide their employers with sufficient notice of their intent to take leave. Employees should provide at least 30 days’ notice if the need for leave is foreseeable, such as in the case of a scheduled medical procedure or the birth or adoption of a child. If the need for leave is not foreseeable, such as in the case of a sudden illness or emergency, employees should provide notice to their employers as soon as practicable.

The FMLA also allows for intermittent leave, which means that eligible employees may take leave in separate blocks of time or may work reduced schedules. For example, an employee may take leave for a few hours each day to care for a family member with a serious health condition, or may work part-time for a few weeks upon their return from leave. Employers must allow employees to take intermittent leave if it is medically necessary or if it is required for the care of a newborn or newly placed child.

While the FMLA provides important protections to eligible employees, it is important to note that the law only provides unpaid leave. Some employers may offer paid leave for family or medical reasons, but this is not required by the FMLA. Additionally, employees who take leave under the FMLA may use any available paid leave (such as vacation or sick leave) to cover some or all of the FMLA leave period.

In conclusion, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is an important labor law that provides eligible employees with unpaid job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons. The law provides several important protections to eligible employees who take leave under its provisions, including continued health insurance coverage and protection from retaliation or interference by employers.

However, it is important to note that the FMLA only provides unpaid leave, and employers are not required to offer paid leave for family or medical reasons. Additionally, employees must meet certain eligibility requirements and provide adequate notice to their employers in order to take leave under the FMLA.

If you believe that your employer has violated your rights under the FMLA, you may file a complaint with the Wage and Hour Division of the U.S. Department of Labor. It is important to consult with an experienced employment law attorney who can help you navigate the FMLA’s complex requirements and ensure that your rights are protected.

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